Clementine Paddleford

Nina May’s Christmas Cookies | How America Eats

“Anyone growing up in Abilene, Kansas, has what the Midwest calls a “goodly heri­tage.” There the prairie is always within sight and sound, a landscape lovely in its wide monotony. It’s a place where neighbor is a common word, where caste or race doesn’t count.

It’s a place where lunch is the fillingest meal, supper almost as ample, this supple­mented by the bedtime snack. It’s a place where the best recipes are hand-downs from mothers to daughters…”

The Rhode Island Johnnycake Experts Speak | How America Eats

This is the last of the stories from New England–and it’s a good one! Sometime later in the week we’ll start wandering around the Middle Atlantic States with Clementine Paddleford, who for 12 years collected recipes and stories for her classic old cookbook, How America Eats (1960). For now, enjoy Clementine’s tale of the johnnycake. …

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New England Chowder, Beef, and Fambé | How America Eats

Continuing on in New England with Clementine Paddleford who is collecting recipes and stories for her classic cookbook, How America Eats (1960). She spent 12 years collecting, and the cookbook charms with her delightful tales of the places she went, and cooks she met. Links to recipes below each story. One more New England story …

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The One-Plate Meal of Early New England | How America Eats

We’re traveling around New England with Clementine Paddleford as she collects recipes and their stories for her cookbook, How America Eats (1960). She’s in Massachusetts now, telling us about the one-plate meal (pg. 24). The one-plate meal of early New England was the boiled dinner, a twice-a-week joy from the early autumn until the sap …

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How America Eats | An old cookbook

For twelve years–beginning 1948–Clementine Paddleford traveled around the country collecting material for her now classic book, How America Eats (1960). Each set of recipes she gathered from farm wives, diner cooks, restaurant chefs, or just the lady in town famous for her caramels is prefaced by an introduction to the person and place.